Core Academy Course Descriptions


#3098 | Aggression Management and Defensive Tactics |12 hours | JPP & SYSC

#3104 | Assessment of Juvenile Probation & Parole (SAVRY) | 3 hours | JPP

#3077 | A Trauma-Informed Approach to Assessing the Mental Health Needs of Families | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3073 | Basic Bridges for CPS | 6 hours | CPS

#3096 | Basic Bridges for JPP | 3 hours | JPP

#3075 | Better Together with Birth Parents for CPS | 12 hours | CPS |2 steps to register: 1-enroll in Bridges and 2-must also contact paula.carrier@granite.edu / 603-833-5148. Limit of 12 staff per session.

#3012 | Better Together with Birth Parents for JPP & SYSC| 12 hours | JPP & SYSC |2 steps to register: 1-enroll in Bridges and 2-must also contact paula.carrier@granite.edu / 603-833-5148. Limit of 12 staff per session.

#3056 | Case Planning REQUIRED Pre-Course Assignment | 3 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3087 | Case Planning in Solution-Based Child Protection | 12 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3024 | Central Registry | 3 hours | CPS & JPP

#3093 | Child Passenger Safety Training | 3 hours | CPS

#3081 | Communicable & Infectious Diseases | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3107 | Community-Based Supervision | 3 hours | JPP

#3094 | Core Academy Capstone for Graduates | 3 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3095 | Courtstream for JJ | 3 hours | JJP

#3066 | Courtstream for SYSC | 3 hours | SYSC

#3114 | CPR/AED/First Aid | 6 hours | SYSC

#3070 | Cultural Competency | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#2253 | DCYF Orientation: Our Practice Model | 3 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3163 | Document Imaging | 3 hours | CPS & JPP

#2936 | Effective Engagement and Communication | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#2998 | The Effects of Abuse and Neglect | 12 hours | CPS

#3101 | Gang Knowledge | 3 hours | JJP & SYSC

#2828 | Human Trafficking: Foundation Training | 3 hours | CPS, JJP, & SYSC

#3108 | ICJ (Interstate Compact on Juveniles) | 3 hours | JPP

#3091 | ICPC (Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children) | 3 hours | CPS

#3079 | Impact of Domestic Violence | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3105 | Introduction to Predispositions | 3 hours | JPP

#3082 | Intro to Solution Based Child Protection (SBC) and Juvenile Probation and Parole | 12 hours | CPS & JPP

#3085 | Investigations and Assessments in Solutions-Based Child Protection | 24 hours | CPS

#3106 | JDAI (Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative) | 3 hours | JPP

#3089 | Legal Aspects of Family-Centered Child Protection | 12 hours | CPS

#3103 | Legal Aspects of Juvenile Probation & Parole (includes motions and violations) | 12 hours | JPP

#3078 | Mental Health Screening Tool (MHST) | 3 hours | CPS & JPP

#3071 | Mentoring (CPS, JPP< & SYSC)

#3100 | Oieoresin Capsicum (OC) Spray | 3 hours | JPP

#3117 | Ombudsman Program | 1 hour | SYSC

#3086 | Permanency | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3126 | Procedures for Parole | 3 hours | JPP & SYSC

#3099 | Proper Use of Handcuffs | 3 hours | JPP & SYSC

#3090 | Report Writing | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3109 | Restorative Practices | 3 hours | JPP & SYSC

#3092 | Revenue Enhancement – Includes RMS (Random Moment Sampling) | 6 hours | CPS & JJP

#3110 | Safe Driver Program | 3 hours | JPP & SYSC

#3097 | Searches | 3 hours | JPP & SYSC

#3121 | Select Populations | 2 hours | JPP & SYSC

#2997 | Separation, Placement, and Reunification in Solution-Based Child Protection | 12 hours | CPS

#3111 | Sexual Harassment and Assult Awareness | 2 hours | SYSC

#3088 | Special Education in Child Protection and Juvenile Probation & Parole | 6 hours | CPS & JPP

#3074 | Staying Safe During Home and Office Visits | 6 hours | CPS, JJP, & SYSC

#3080 | Substance Abuse (The Impact of Addiction & Drug Abuse) | 6 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3014 | Supporting Adolescents in Child Welfare – Part 1 Online | 9 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3015 | Supporting Adolescents in Child Welfare – Part 2 Face-to-Face | 3 hours | CPS, JPP, & SYSC

#3118 | SYSC Fire Safety | 1 hour | SYSC

#3115 | SYSC Guide to Behavioral Learning, Expectations, and Related Practices | 3 hours | SYSC

#3116 | SYSC Programming | 2 hours | SYSC

#3113 | SYSC Safety and Security | 3 hours | SYSC

#3119 | SYSC Youth Suicide Prevention – Policy and Procedures | 2 hours | SYSC

#3120 | Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI) | 18 hours | SYSC

#3076 | Working with Families Coping with Mental Health Issues | 12 hours | CPS, JJP, & SYSC

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The Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) began in 1992 by the Annie E Casey Foundation in response to the high number of low-level juvenile offenders that were held in secure facilities across the country. The initiative set out to demonstrate that jurisdictions could safely reduce their reliance on secure confinement, and strengthen their juvenile justice systems, by utilizing a series of 8 core reform strategies. These strategies include: collaborating; using data to inform decisions; having an objective admissions process; having an array of alternatives to detention; reforming the case processing process; reducing racial disparities; improving the conditions of confinement; and paying attention to special detention cases. JDAI is active in 39 states and over 200 jurisdictions. NH has been a JDAI site since the early 2000s.

Better Together is an intensive two-day workshop facilitated by one birth parent and one child welfare staff/ally. Better Together is a program developed by Casey Family Services and is aimed at fostering equal and mutually respectful partnerships between birth parents, child welfare agency staff and community allies. Classroom-based.

This training covers Federal legislation, New Hampshire’s legal definitions of abuse, neglect, and the New Hampshire Neglect/Abuse Reporting Statute, and gives an overview of the Family court process. Also addressed are the permanent commitment process, what constitutes good testimony, and the caseworker's role and responsibilities in the courtroom (complete with mock–trial). Participants will learn about the various parts of the Appeals Process and pertinent NH Supreme Court decisions (i.e. Bagley, Jane Doe & Ethan H.) Classroom-based.

This training is designed to help newly graduating staff from the full Core Academy requirements demonstrate their learning by showcasing their newly acquired knowledge that they feel will enhance their job performance related to Title IV E activities. Graduates should be able to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of DCYF’s practice model, family engagement practices and how an assessment of a child/youth’s safety and needs impacts and informs case planning. They also need to be able to speak to how what they have learned has impacted their own self-awareness as it relates to communicating and interacting with not only families from diverse cultures and environments but colleagues, community stakeholders, their supervisors, and administration.

This module addresses the legal base for child welfare practice. The trainer covers Federal legislation, New Hampshire’s legal definitions of abuse, neglect, and the New Hampshire Neglect/Abuse Reporting Statute, and gives an overview of the Family court process. Also addressed are the permanent commitment process, what constitutes good testimony, and the caseworker's role and responsibilities in the courtroom (complete with mock–trial). Participants will learn about the various parts of the Appeals Process and pertinent NH Supreme Court decisions (i.e. Bagley, Jane Doe & Ethan H.). Classroom-based.

This workshop stresses the importance of joint case planning by the worker and the family to assure timely, high quality, culturally relevant services to families. Participants learn how to engage and involve families in the case planning and delivery process. Including steps in the planning process; developing appropriate goals, objectives, and activities; engaging fathers in the process; understanding the purpose of case management and direct service provision; reassessment; and case reviews. Classroom-based.

The mentoring program is designed to provide support to new staff beyond the typical supervisory relationship. This training brings both mentors and mentees together to discuss the concept, benefits, expectations and the implementation of the Mentoring Program at NH DCYF. Mentoring is intended to assist the new CPSW in understanding the functions of their role and the environment in which they will perform their duties and is guided by the Core workbook that accompanies the eight Core Training Modules. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an understanding of the major impacts of culture on individual, interpersonal and organizational behavior. It examines the fundamental cultural differences that are currently present in today’s society from the perspective of perception, behavior, and values. The day includes discussion of the ways that these differences can impact the delivery of services. Suggestions are given for implementing culturally sensitive dialogues with adolescents, family members, and service providers. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This training stresses the importance of joint case planning by the worker and the family to assure timely, high quality, culturally relevant services to families and their youth as it relates to the juvenile justice field. Participants learn steps in the planning process; developing appropriate goals, objectives, and activities.

This training provides an in-depth overview of the mission, vision, values, principles, and strategies which guide agency practice with children and families in New Hampshire. The course is trained by agency administrators including the Director, who speak to the specifics of how to engage families in services, placement of children, development of case plans, permanency planning and ethics related to the agencies IV-E plan. Policies, procedures, and practices are discussed via case examples. Classroom-based.

This workshop will provide crucial information regarding the various federal funding sources and how to access these sources in order to provide services to children & families. Staff will learn about the various federal funding sources, IV-A, IV-E and Medicaid for both services and administration. Documentation requirements for accessing federal funds will be discussed. Classroom-based.

Participants will learn searching procedures for searching visitors and residents of a placement facility as well as methods to control contraband, etc. Participants will also learn how to conduct searches in the confines of a residential (home) setting and the steps involved in securing found items. Classroom-based

This workshop will provide staff with a working knowledge of Special Education in New Hampshire, disabilities, the impact on education and the James O. Consent Decree. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This workshop is based on the belief that staff can provide appropriate, effective interventions in crisis situations. Staff will gain practical strategies and techniques for managing behaviors in various levels of crisis. Emphasis will be placed on understanding crisis and developing the skills to prevent crisis or intervene in early crisis situations. Safe preparation and interventions necessary for safe home and office visits will also be covered. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This training provides an overview of NH Gangs and National Gangs with particular attention to identifying signs/tags/graffiti in order to stay safe and work with youth effectively that are either directly or indirectly involved with gangs.

This workshop will discuss various facts and myths about mental illness, its impact on families, and available services. The discussion will cover various major mental illnesses that affect both adults and children as well as how the system works to serve individuals and families. The training will cover intervention strategies and options. In addition, individuals with personal experience of the mental health system of NH will be present to share their perspectives and assist trainees to build communication skills and competency related to work with children and families affected by mental illness.

This training will provide an overview of the Interstate on Juveniles. Participants will be given an overview of the Interstate Compact on the placement of Juveniles as it relates to state and federal regulations. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This workshop will discuss various facts and myths about mental illness, its impact on families and what services are available. Discussions will include the various major mental illnesses that affect both adults and children and how the system works to serve individuals and families. Intervention strategies and options will be discussed. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This workshop gives an overview of the function and purpose of the Central Registry. Participants will learn about the various parts of the Appeals Process (i.e., testimony, witnesses, rules, evidence and confidentially). Participants will learn how to access the central registry in Bridges, and have step by step instructions for sending information to the Central Registry.  This course will be delivered in an on-line learning format.

This course provides an overview of a variety of childhood infectious diseases and alerts caregivers to situations that have the potential for disease transmission. The course clarifies how infections occur, how they are passed from one person to another, universal precautions, immunization and other ways of protecting children and their caregivers from illness.

This course is built for Juvenile Probation and Parole officers that are beginning their career or those that want a refresher on best practices in Juvenile Probation. Focus is on how to communicate effectively with families to ensure that the principles of safety, permanency and well being are being implemented in the home and the DCYF staff is helping to create supervision plans that keep the youth in the community, at home and in their home school district. Support services and resources are used to help family with optimal functioning and teach the youth critical thinking, healthy decision making skills and lasting productive life skills.

During this course, we create read-only YouthCenter/CourtStream accounts for all new employees, learn the basics of site navigation, how to review facility entries for accuracy, such as approved and non-approved youth visitors & contacts, and how to retrieve reports from the system in PDF format.

Field staff will also learn about the YouthCenter/CourtStream alerting feature and what to expect in Outlook when they have been included in a facility alert.

During this course, we create YouthCenter/CourtStream accounts for all new employees, learn the basics of site navigation and learn how to complete entries into the site, such as generate daily log entries, contact log entries & room changes.

This course will also prepare the staff for Report Writing, as all facility incidents are entered and communicated to facility/field staff through this system.

The Heartsaver First Aid and CPR/AED Course are designed to prepare people to provide First Aid, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) use in a safe, timely, and effective manner. The course goals include cognitive and psychomotor objectives.

 

In this course, you will learn about the guide’s creation & the importance of the structure it brings to our facility youth & staff.

This guide and the practices it outlines were established to simplify the reporting process for staff’s ease of use while creating rule violation categories (minor, moderate and major), connecting fair consequences to these specified categories, resulting in consistency in expectations & consequence throughout the facility, while still giving SYSC youth a voice/choice in the decision making process

This 3-hour course will help social service providers and first responders to identify and support people who are at risk for or have experienced, human trafficking.  This course covers the definitions and global dimensions of human trafficking; landscape and red flags for labor and sex trafficking; identification and engagements; and, relevant policies and procedures for responding to situations of Human Trafficking.  This training incorporates lecture, video, activities, and small group discussions.

This course will teach participants how to effectively communicate with families, youth and collaterals in an attempt to fact find information needed for a PDI. They learn what a PDI is when it is ordered, why it is valuable and how to benefit from having good relationships with collaterals. Discussion and practice are around the DCYF policy and how that can guide your practice and how to complete the report using Bridges.

Participants learn what the Mental Health Screening Tool is, why it is important to screen and what the tool measures. Participants are given a glimpse of each section of the tool, the questions asked and discussion is held about why it is designed as it is.

Participants learn how to administer the tool, how to talk to families and children about the tool and who is responsible for answering the tool questions. Participants prepare screening tools for case examples. The information is put into Qualtrics and participants are shown how to enter information, how to interpret results, what happens with results and how to document within Qualtrics and case files.

The JPPOs will learn how to properly use O.C. spray when they are at risk of imminent harm or being assaulted while on duty. Medical issues, decontamination procedures, policy and liability issues will be taught. They will also learn how to carry, store and care for O.C. canisters.

The mission of the Office of the Ombudsman is to respond to complaints and requests for assistance from clients, employees, and members of the general public and to resolve disagreements related to matters within the jurisdiction of the Department of Health and Human Services. This is done utilizing unbiased investigation and fact-finding, mediation and/or other alternative dispute resolution methods, and information and referral.

This course will focus on the importance of permanency for children in the foster care system. Participants will identify the timeframes established to achieve timely permanency for children and permanency goals. This course will touch on siblings' relationships, court protocols, the stability of placement, concurrent plans, FAIR meetings, Match Meetings, Disclosure meetings, PPT, and post-adoption services.

This training speaks to SYSC’s role in DCYF’s continuum of care for adolescents who have been legally committed for treatment services.  Attendants will understand the flow of assessment to identify treatment needs, the SYSC Classification Board case review process to place youth into a treatment program and how therapeutic progress is measured to consider the question of risk mitigation.

 

Awareness of the rational of Restorative Practices implementation and certification processes within DCYF for SYSC staff and JPPOs.

 

This training is based on the belief that staff can provide appropriate, effective interventions in crisis situations.  Staff will gain practical strategies and techniques for managing behaviors in various levels of crisis.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding crisis and developing the skills to prevent crisis or intervene in early crisis situations.  Safe preparation and interventions necessary for safe home and office visits will also be covered. This course is delivered in the classroom.

In this class; you will examine the grieving process, and how to help caregivers recognize signs of stress related to loss. You will learn about Separation, Placement, and Reunification from the perspective of the child, the birth parent, and the caregiver. The student will be able to identify different viewpoints and learn how to support families through the process.

This course will provide education about addiction, recovery and relapse.  Various forms of treatment, the process of relapse and the impact of parental SUD’s on children will be discussed during the training.  The DCYF drug testing process is reviewed and drug testing as a tool for motivation and accountability is discussed.   A presentation about various drugs and drug paraphernalia is provided to participants including ways to identify signs and symptoms of impairment.

This course trains professionals and community members to prevent and respond effectively to suicide across the lifespan. Our public health, the socio-ecological model emphasizes collaboration between service providers.  Best practice protocols are provided for each service provider discipline. The training can be customized to meet the needs of a community or organization.  Increases the capacity of professionals and communities to prevent suicide across the lifespan.  Connect uses a public health approach and incorporates key elements of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy.  Applying a unique holistic model and offering a community planning component,  Connect stands apart from other training programs.

The aim of Cornell university’s Therapeutic Crisis Intervention system is to reduce or eliminate the need for physical intervention and to provide care workers with the skills and knowledge to become the catalyst through which the young person changes old habits, destructive responses, and maladaptive behavior patterns. The goal of this core training program is to train care workers to prevent crisis through an understanding of how the environment and the workers’ interactions with young people affect children in care. Helping children develop new responses to their environment will enable them to achieve a higher level of social and emotional maturity.

Training providing techniques based on the Mechanical Advantage Control Holds™ (M.A.C.H.), which is a highly effective tool for engaging and redirecting youth motivated by fear, anger, drugs, alcohol, medication, or lack of medication. M.A.C.H. redirects a youth's resistance.

 

Participants explore the casework approach as an integration of engagement and protective authority; Dynamics of resistance, cultural competency, and current research are introduced to interviewing strategies to promote engagement in child protective services. The family’s rights brochure is also used to demonstrate the importance of CAPTA and empowering families to be part of the decision-making process. Elements of family culture and its impact on case planning are reviewed Classroom based.

This module explores principles common to all investigative processes, and unique principles for investigation of sexual abuse, physical abuse, and neglect. Participants learn the factors to consider in planning and conducting investigations, including the application of CAPTA to respect parents’ Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment rights during investigations. This module establishes the child protective services process of assessment as the fundamental and critical prerequisite for all case decision-making. Seven steps of critical thinking are applied to assessments at the point of referral, intake, family services, placement planning, and reunification. Participants learn the complexity of conducting thorough and accurate assessments and the factors that impact that process. Participants receive instruction on the purpose, factors to consider, and information-gathering strategies for safety, risk, and family assessments. This is a classroom-based training.

This training is designed to provide trainees with a functional knowledge of policy procedures related to parole hearings, revocation hearings, parole reviews and formal notifications to families regarding their youth’s parole hearing. This is a classroom-based training.

This training is designed to help new staff understand the proper techniques of applying handcuffs and removing them, to ensure the safety of both the staff and subject of injury.

(This training is offered by DHHS ODTS either in the classroom or online.)

This course will teach the driver about defensive driving preparation, hazard perception, and attitude — techniques that will help you stay safe on the roadways.

Explore the history of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA).
Participants will recognize the role of the first responder, Identify the expectations and limitations of being a first responder, recognize the juvenile PREA standards, identify the role of the first responder in the investigatory process, recognize the effects of vicarious trauma, explore ways to manage stress, and explore how to actively listen as a first responder.

This course, followed by Adolescent Mental Health Issues and Juvenile Justice Services will explore the needs of select populations and appropriate interventions and case management services for juvenile fire setters, sexual offenders, females and other youth that need additional interventions, services, and case management skills. This training is delivered in the classroom.

This training will give a clear understanding of the overall duties, and responsibilities that staff have during a fire emergency. This will include: what action they should take on the discovery of a fire, know the difference between different fire classes, which extinguisher to use for which fire and what the evacuation procedure is.

The training provided information about basic car seat safety, different types of car seats, how to ensure that a child is properly secured in their car seat, and how to place a car seat correctly in your car. The training also covered the difference between rear-facing and front-facing car seats.

This workshop will provide an overview of the Interstate Compact on the placement of children, and the Interstate Compact on Juveniles. Participants will be given an overview of the Interstate Compact on the placement of children and the Interstate Compact on Juveniles. This course is will be delivered in the classroom and will be explored for a possible transition to on-line delivery.

This classroom-based training provides introductory information and education to staff utilizing “Bridges,” DCYF’s SACWIS data system. This training provides information on all five of the Bridges modules for staff.

Training providing techniques based on the Mechanical Advantage Control Holds™ (M.A.C.H.), which is a highly effective tool for engaging and redirecting youth motivated by fear, anger, drugs, alcohol, medication, or lack of medication. M.A.C.H. redirects a youth's resistance.

 

This course teaches new JPPO staff on how to complete a SAVRY and why one is done. They learn how to gather the information needed for the SAVRY and how to complete the SAVRY on Bridges. Much of the dialogue and classroom exercises look at how and why doing assessments for future violence is crucial in JJ cases. There is dialogue about why reassessments are necessary and how they drive JJ practice based on policy standards.

This workshop will discuss various facts and myths about mental illness, its impact on families, and available services. The discussion will cover various major mental illnesses that affect both adults and children as well as how the system works to serve individuals and families. The training will cover intervention strategies and options. In addition, individuals with personal experience of the mental health system of NH will be present to share their perspectives and assist trainees to build communication skills and competency related to work with children and families affected by mental illness.

This classroom-based training provides introductory information and education to staff utilizing “Bridges,” DCYF’s SACWIS data system. This training provides information on all five of the Bridges modules for staff.

Better Together is an intensive two-day workshop facilitated by one birth parent and one child welfare staff/ally. Better Together is a program developed by Casey Family Services and is aimed at fostering equal and mutually respectful partnerships between birth parents, child welfare agency staff and community allies. Classroom-based.

This workshop stresses the importance of joint case planning by the worker and the family to assure timely, high quality, culturally relevant services to families. Participants learn how to engage and involve families in the case planning and delivery process. Including steps in the planning process; developing appropriate goals, objectives, and activities; engaging fathers in the process; understanding the purpose of case management and direct service provision; reassessment; and case reviews. Classroom-based.

This workshop gives an overview of the function and purpose of the Central Registry. Participants will learn about the various parts of the Appeals Process (i.e., testimony, witnesses, rules, evidence and confidentially). Participants will learn how to access the central registry in Bridges, and have step by step instructions for sending information to the Central Registry.  This course will be delivered in an on-line learning format.

The training provided information about basic car seat safety, different types of car seats, how to ensure that a child is properly secured in their car seat, and how to place a car seat correctly in your car. The training also covered the difference between rear-facing and front-facing car seats.

This course provides an overview of a variety of childhood infectious diseases and alerts caregivers to situations that have the potential for disease transmission. The course clarifies how infections occur, how they are passed from one person to another, universal precautions, immunization and other ways of protecting children and their caregivers from illness.

This course is built for Juvenile Probation and Parole officers that are beginning their career or those that want a refresher on best practices in Juvenile Probation. Focus is on how to communicate effectively with families to ensure that the principles of safety, permanency and well being are being implemented in the home and the DCYF staff is helping to create supervision plans that keep the youth in the community, at home and in their home school district. Support services and resources are used to help family with optimal functioning and teach the youth critical thinking, healthy decision making skills and lasting productive life skills.

This training is designed to help newly graduating staff from the full Core Academy requirements demonstrate their learning by showcasing their newly acquired knowledge that they feel will enhance their job performance related to Title IV E activities. Graduates should be able to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of DCYF’s practice model, family engagement practices and how an assessment of a child/youth’s safety and needs impacts and informs case planning. They also need to be able to speak to how what they have learned has impacted their own self-awareness as it relates to communicating and interacting with not only families from diverse cultures and environments but colleagues, community stakeholders, their supervisors, and administration.

During this course, we create read-only YouthCenter/CourtStream accounts for all new employees, learn the basics of site navigation, how to review facility entries for accuracy, such as approved and non-approved youth visitors & contacts, and how to retrieve reports from the system in PDF format.

Field staff will also learn about the YouthCenter/CourtStream alerting feature and what to expect in Outlook when they have been included in a facility alert.

During this course, we create YouthCenter/CourtStream accounts for all new employees, learn the basics of site navigation and learn how to complete entries into the site, such as generate daily log entries, contact log entries & room changes.

This course will also prepare the staff for Report Writing, as all facility incidents are entered and communicated to facility/field staff through this system.

The Heartsaver First Aid and CPR/AED Course are designed to prepare people to provide First Aid, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) use in a safe, timely, and effective manner. The course goals include cognitive and psychomotor objectives.

 

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an understanding of the major impacts of culture on individual, interpersonal and organizational behavior. It examines the fundamental cultural differences that are currently present in today’s society from the perspective of perception, behavior, and values. The day includes discussion of the ways that these differences can impact the delivery of services. Suggestions are given for implementing culturally sensitive dialogues with adolescents, family members, and service providers. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This training provides an in-depth overview of the mission, vision, values, principles, and strategies which guide agency practice with children and families in New Hampshire. The course is trained by agency administrators including the Director, who speak to the specifics of how to engage families in services, placement of children, development of case plans, permanency planning and ethics related to the agencies IV-E plan. Policies, procedures, and practices are discussed via case examples. Classroom-based.

This workshop examines the developmental consequences of child abuse and neglect from birth through adolescence; establishes a framework for the early recognition of developmental problems, and stresses the importance of including developmental and remedial services in child welfare case plans. Strategies to promote the healthy development of children who have been abused and neglected are presented. Classroom-based

This training provides an overview of NH Gangs and National Gangs with particular attention to identifying signs/tags/graffiti in order to stay safe and work with youth effectively that are either directly or indirectly involved with gangs.

This 3-hour course will help social service providers and first responders to identify and support people who are at risk for or have experienced, human trafficking.  This course covers the definitions and global dimensions of human trafficking; landscape and red flags for labor and sex trafficking; identification and engagements; and, relevant policies and procedures for responding to situations of Human Trafficking.  This training incorporates lecture, video, activities, and small group discussions.

This training will provide an overview of the Interstate on Juveniles. Participants will be given an overview of the Interstate Compact on the placement of Juveniles as it relates to state and federal regulations. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This workshop will provide an overview of the Interstate Compact on the placement of children, and the Interstate Compact on Juveniles. Participants will be given an overview of the Interstate Compact on the placement of children and the Interstate Compact on Juveniles. This course is will be delivered in the classroom and will be explored for a possible transition to on-line delivery.

This course will teach participants how to effectively communicate with families, youth and collaterals in an attempt to fact find information needed for a PDI. They learn what a PDI is when it is ordered, why it is valuable and how to benefit from having good relationships with collaterals. Discussion and practice are around the DCYF policy and how that can guide your practice and how to complete the report using Bridges.

Participants explore the casework approach as an integration of engagement and protective authority; Dynamics of resistance, cultural competency, and current research are introduced to interviewing strategies to promote engagement in child protective services. The family’s rights brochure is also used to demonstrate the importance of CAPTA and empowering families to be part of the decision-making process. Elements of family culture and its impact on case planning are reviewed Classroom based.

This module explores principles common to all investigative processes, and unique principles for investigation of sexual abuse, physical abuse, and neglect. Participants learn the factors to consider in planning and conducting investigations, including the application of CAPTA to respect parents’ Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment rights during investigations. This module establishes the child protective services process of assessment as the fundamental and critical prerequisite for all case decision-making. Seven steps of critical thinking are applied to assessments at the point of referral, intake, family services, placement planning, and reunification. Participants learn the complexity of conducting thorough and accurate assessments and the factors that impact that process. Participants receive instruction on the purpose, factors to consider, and information-gathering strategies for safety, risk, and family assessments. This is a classroom-based training.

The Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) began in 1992 by the Annie E Casey Foundation in response to the high number of low-level juvenile offenders that were held in secure facilities across the country. The initiative set out to demonstrate that jurisdictions could safely reduce their reliance on secure confinement, and strengthen their juvenile justice systems, by utilizing a series of 8 core reform strategies. These strategies include: collaborating; using data to inform decisions; having an objective admissions process; having an array of alternatives to detention; reforming the case processing process; reducing racial disparities; improving the conditions of confinement; and paying attention to special detention cases. JDAI is active in 39 states and over 200 jurisdictions. NH has been a JDAI site since the early 2000s.

This training covers Federal legislation, New Hampshire’s legal definitions of abuse, neglect, and the New Hampshire Neglect/Abuse Reporting Statute, and gives an overview of the Family court process. Also addressed are the permanent commitment process, what constitutes good testimony, and the caseworker's role and responsibilities in the courtroom (complete with mock–trial). Participants will learn about the various parts of the Appeals Process and pertinent NH Supreme Court decisions (i.e. Bagley, Jane Doe & Ethan H.) Classroom-based.

This module addresses the legal base for child welfare practice. The trainer covers Federal legislation, New Hampshire’s legal definitions of abuse, neglect, and the New Hampshire Neglect/Abuse Reporting Statute, and gives an overview of the Family court process. Also addressed are the permanent commitment process, what constitutes good testimony, and the caseworker's role and responsibilities in the courtroom (complete with mock–trial). Participants will learn about the various parts of the Appeals Process and pertinent NH Supreme Court decisions (i.e. Bagley, Jane Doe & Ethan H.). Classroom-based.

Participants learn what the Mental Health Screening Tool is, why it is important to screen and what the tool measures. Participants are given a glimpse of each section of the tool, the questions asked and discussion is held about why it is designed as it is.

Participants learn how to administer the tool, how to talk to families and children about the tool and who is responsible for answering the tool questions. Participants prepare screening tools for case examples. The information is put into Qualtrics and participants are shown how to enter information, how to interpret results, what happens with results and how to document within Qualtrics and case files.

The mentoring program is designed to provide support to new staff beyond the typical supervisory relationship. This training brings both mentors and mentees together to discuss the concept, benefits, expectations and the implementation of the Mentoring Program at NH DCYF. Mentoring is intended to assist the new CPSW in understanding the functions of their role and the environment in which they will perform their duties and is guided by the Core workbook that accompanies the eight Core Training Modules. This course is delivered in the classroom.

The JPPOs will learn how to properly use O.C. spray when they are at risk of imminent harm or being assaulted while on duty. Medical issues, decontamination procedures, policy and liability issues will be taught. They will also learn how to carry, store and care for O.C. canisters.

The mission of the Office of the Ombudsman is to respond to complaints and requests for assistance from clients, employees, and members of the general public and to resolve disagreements related to matters within the jurisdiction of the Department of Health and Human Services. This is done utilizing unbiased investigation and fact-finding, mediation and/or other alternative dispute resolution methods, and information and referral.

This course will focus on the importance of permanency for children in the foster care system. Participants will identify the timeframes established to achieve timely permanency for children and permanency goals. This course will touch on siblings' relationships, court protocols, the stability of placement, concurrent plans, FAIR meetings, Match Meetings, Disclosure meetings, PPT, and post-adoption services.

This training is designed to provide trainees with a functional knowledge of policy procedures related to parole hearings, revocation hearings, parole reviews and formal notifications to families regarding their youth’s parole hearing. This is a classroom-based training.

This training is designed to help new staff understand the proper techniques of applying handcuffs and removing them, to ensure the safety of both the staff and subject of injury.

This training stresses the importance of joint case planning by the worker and the family to assure timely, high quality, culturally relevant services to families and their youth as it relates to the juvenile justice field. Participants learn steps in the planning process; developing appropriate goals, objectives, and activities.

Awareness of the rational of Restorative Practices implementation and certification processes within DCYF for SYSC staff and JPPOs.

 

This course provides revenue information and the impact of staff’s work on revenue and ways to enhance it.  The course includes information on different funding sources and timelines as well as provides an overview of the financial factors of a case.  This course provide the staff with resources on how they can maximize revenue.

(This training is offered by DHHS ODTS either in the classroom or online.)

This course will teach the driver about defensive driving preparation, hazard perception, and attitude — techniques that will help you stay safe on the roadways.

Participants will learn searching procedures for searching visitors and residents of a placement facility as well as methods to control contraband, etc. Participants will also learn how to conduct searches in the confines of a residential (home) setting and the steps involved in securing found items. Classroom-based

This course, followed by Adolescent Mental Health Issues and Juvenile Justice Services will explore the needs of select populations and appropriate interventions and case management services for juvenile fire setters, sexual offenders, females and other youth that need additional interventions, services, and case management skills. This training is delivered in the classroom.

In this class; you will examine the grieving process, and how to help caregivers recognize signs of stress related to loss. You will learn about Separation, Placement, and Reunification from the perspective of the child, the birth parent, and the caregiver. The student will be able to identify different viewpoints and learn how to support families through the process.

Explore the history of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA).
Participants will recognize the role of the first responder, Identify the expectations and limitations of being a first responder, recognize the juvenile PREA standards, identify the role of the first responder in the investigatory process, recognize the effects of vicarious trauma, explore ways to manage stress, and explore how to actively listen as a first responder.

This workshop will provide staff with a working knowledge of Special Education in New Hampshire, disabilities, the impact on education and the James O. Consent Decree. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This workshop is based on the belief that staff can provide appropriate, effective interventions in crisis situations. Staff will gain practical strategies and techniques for managing behaviors in various levels of crisis. Emphasis will be placed on understanding crisis and developing the skills to prevent crisis or intervene in early crisis situations. Safe preparation and interventions necessary for safe home and office visits will also be covered. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This course will provide education about addiction, recovery and relapse.  Various forms of treatment, the process of relapse and the impact of parental SUD’s on children will be discussed during the training.  The DCYF drug testing process is reviewed and drug testing as a tool for motivation and accountability is discussed.   A presentation about various drugs and drug paraphernalia is provided to participants including ways to identify signs and symptoms of impairment.

Adolescence is an exciting time for youth and those who care for them. The adolescence stage of development is a critical time and is another opportunity for adults to support the continued development of youth and young adults. Understanding adolescent development can help supportive adults work with youth in a more productive manner and promote open lines of communication. This class is designed for new child welfare workers to identify ways they can support adolescents on their caseloads, understand the development of adolescents, and ways to support them throughout their time in foster care and when they age out.

This training will give a clear understanding of the overall duties, and responsibilities that staff have during a fire emergency. This will include: what action they should take on the discovery of a fire, know the difference between different fire classes, which extinguisher to use for which fire and what the evacuation procedure is.

In this course, you will learn about the guide’s creation & the importance of the structure it brings to our facility youth & staff.

This guide and the practices it outlines were established to simplify the reporting process for staff’s ease of use while creating rule violation categories (minor, moderate and major), connecting fair consequences to these specified categories, resulting in consistency in expectations & consequence throughout the facility, while still giving SYSC youth a voice/choice in the decision making process

This training speaks to SYSC’s role in DCYF’s continuum of care for adolescents who have been legally committed for treatment services.  Attendants will understand the flow of assessment to identify treatment needs, the SYSC Classification Board case review process to place youth into a treatment program and how therapeutic progress is measured to consider the question of risk mitigation.

 

This training is based on the belief that staff can provide appropriate, effective interventions in crisis situations.  Staff will gain practical strategies and techniques for managing behaviors in various levels of crisis.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding crisis and developing the skills to prevent crisis or intervene in early crisis situations.  Safe preparation and interventions necessary for safe home and office visits will also be covered. This course is delivered in the classroom.

This course trains professionals and community members to prevent and respond effectively to suicide across the lifespan. Our public health, the socio-ecological model emphasizes collaboration between service providers.  Best practice protocols are provided for each service provider discipline. The training can be customized to meet the needs of a community or organization.  Increases the capacity of professionals and communities to prevent suicide across the lifespan.  Connect uses a public health approach and incorporates key elements of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy.  Applying a unique holistic model and offering a community planning component,  Connect stands apart from other training programs.

The aim of Cornell university’s Therapeutic Crisis Intervention system is to reduce or eliminate the need for physical intervention and to provide care workers with the skills and knowledge to become the catalyst through which the young person changes old habits, destructive responses, and maladaptive behavior patterns. The goal of this core training program is to train care workers to prevent crisis through an understanding of how the environment and the workers’ interactions with young people affect children in care. Helping children develop new responses to their environment will enable them to achieve a higher level of social and emotional maturity.

This workshop will discuss various facts and myths about mental illness, its impact on families and what services are available. Discussions will include the various major mental illnesses that affect both adults and children and how the system works to serve individuals and families. Intervention strategies and options will be discussed. This course is delivered in the classroom.